The State of Working America, 12th edition: Coming Tuesday, Sept. 11

The State of Working America is EPI’s authoritative analysis of the economic conditions of America’s workers. Visit StateofWorkingAmerica.org for up-to-date numbers on the economy, updated when new data are released.


Aug. 29: Unions, inequality, and faltering middle-class wages

Figure AFigure A (continued)

Union coverage rate in the United States, 1973–2011

Source: Author's analysis of Hirsch and Macpherson (2003) and updates from the Union Membership and Coverage Database

 


July 24: U.S. poverty rates higher, safety net weaker than in peer countries

Figure DFigure D (continued)

Child poverty rate in selected developed countries, 2009

Note: The child poverty rate is the share of children living in households with income below half of household-size-adjusted median income.

Source: Adamson (2012, Figure 1b)


May 24: Labor force participation: Cyclical versus structural changes since the start of the Great Recession


May 2: CEO pay and the top 1%: How executive compensation and financial-sector pay have fueled income inequality

Figure AFigure A (continued)

CEO-to-worker compensation ratio, with options granted and options realized,1965–2011

Note: "Options granted" compensation series includes salary, bonus, restricted stock grants, options granted, and long-term incentive payouts for CEOs at the top 350 firms ranked by sales. "Options exercised" compensation series includes salary, bonus, restricted stock grants, options exercised, and long-term incentive payouts for CEOs at the top 350 firms ranked by sales.

Sources: Authors' analysis of data from Compustat ExecuComp database, Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics program, and Bureau of Economic Analysis National Income and Product Accounts Tables


April 26: The wedges between productivity and median compensation growth

”Figure”Figure (continued)

South Carolina

Year Population growth Job growth
1977 53,833   34,763 
1978 110,250   89,901 
1979 162,000   130,560 
1980 213,833   147,048 
1981 259,166   159,803 
1982 299,916   137,414 
1983 333,666   171,055 
1984 371,083   248,551 
1985 419,083   278,670 
1986 447,916   320,745 
1987 487,916   361,681 
1988 525,583   432,572 
1989 558,583   481,867 
1990 604,426   536,306 
1991 656,342   509,729 
1992 692,328   521,024 
1993 732,063   555,018 
1994 767,632   602,542 
1995 806,535   661,612 
1996 843,687   703,908 
1997 890,422   764,346 
1998 938,408   814,999 
1999 982,143   864,249 
2000 1,019,950   903,378 
2001 1,056,774   880,130 
2002 1,091,322   871,600 
2003 1,126,498   887,330 
2004 1,171,228   929,223 
2005 1,226,632   979,850 
2006 1,298,020   1,042,185 
2007 1,367,131   1,105,884 
2008 1,432,557   1,095,982 
2009 1,483,031   991,445 
2010 1,557,202   981,186 
2011 1,604,631   1,050,968 
2012 1,648,098   1,076,841 
2013 1,696,864   1,124,351 
2014 1,751,585   1,188,007 
2015 1,814,992   1,260,297 
2016 1,880,588   1,323,594 
2017 1,890,228   1,383,725 
2018 1,941,031   1,469,947 
2019 1,995,184   1,525,095 


March 7: Entry-level workers’ wages fell in lost decade

Figure BFigure B (continued)

Entry-level wages of male and female college graduates


Other media outlets and blogs that have covered the data include BBC News, Forbes, Gawker, Huffington Post, In These Times, MarketPlace RadioNational Journal, PoliticoReuters, Village Voice, and the Washington Post.